Sunday, May 24, 2020

Ethics Case Studies - 1850 Words

Anencephalics as organ donors: In this matter of the use of anencephalics as organ donors, the New Natural Law theorist must first consider that which is alive, what constitutes life in the eyes of the current law system, and the value of a life for the possible extension of another life, or possibly lives. I have come to the conclusion that New Natural Law would allow for an anencephalic to be an organ donor on the basis that it would not have the ability to live and pursue self- sustainable life, therefore the right to life is the moral fulfillment that this particular ethicist would pursue. Phronesis applied to the individual in question would not allow for life to be pursued since the child is born dying due to lack of means to survive. The moral fulfillment of the New Natural Law Theory is human flourishing based upon the virtuous pursuit of the seven basic and reflexive goods of the theory. Therefore, any anencephalic is born in a vegetative state and in essence is born dying, however science would prove that any human being is naturally born dying. The very fact that one is born means that there is death for that life. For the New Natural Law Theorist, life is given, or better the status of being alive is given to anyone who is born with brain function. This is to state that anyone who is born of a human and has any functionality can be considered alive. In order for modern science to maintain the life of an individual by means of a breathing apparatus,Show MoreRelatedCase Study of Ethics5588 Words   |  23 PagesDilemmas Case Studies Professional Accountants in Business December 20112 Contents Introduction ...............................................................................................................................3 Case Study 1...............................................................................................................................5 Pressure to overstate stock valuation ...................................................................................5 Case Study 2...Read MoreCase Study on Ethics and Dual Relationships in Social Work Essay1050 Words   |  5 PagesEthics Case Study: Juan S. The social worker in this case study worked at the ABC Children’s Wellness Center. An ESL teacher at a local elementary school referred Juan S. to her. Juan came to the center with his mother, Silvia. Before seeing Juan and his mother, the social worker called the ESL teacher who referred Juan to her to discuss the case. The teacher reported that Juan was showing little interest in classroom activities or his peers, and always seemed exhausted. He was irritable andRead MoreEthics Case Study772 Words   |  4 PagesEthics Case Study Ronda Butman University of Phoenix Health Care Ethics and Social Responsibility HCS 335 Nicovich November 26, 2010 Ethics Case Study In today’s health care culture some individuals are presented to undertake unlawful medical actions based on personal guidance; however, ethical and legal issues effect one’s actions if he or she is not qualified to make such decisions. The case of Jerry McCall is an example of such a scenario in today’s health care environment. Read MoreEthics Case Study1149 Words   |  5 PagesEthics Case Study Everyday health care workers around the world are faced with tough decisions. The law guides many decisions but some decisions require ethical considerations. Making good ethical decisions is not always as easy as it seems. Making ethical decisions is even harder when the primary intention is to be helpful, but it is beyond an employee’s qualifications. Jerry’s Qualifications versus Necessary Qualifications Qualification as a medical assistant and a licensed practicalRead MoreEthics Case Study817 Words   |  4 Pagesbenefits). Reference Legge Jr, J. Durant, R. (2010). Public Opinion, Risk Assessment, and Biotechnology: Lessons from Attitudes toward Genetically Modified Foods in the European Union.The Policy Studies Organization, Vol 27, # 1 Smyth, S. Phillips, P. (2014). Risk, regulation and biotechnology: The case of GM crops.GM Crops Food 5:3, 170--177 Romeis, J. et al. (2008). Assessment of risk of insect-resistant transgenic crops to nontarget arthropods. Nature Biotechnology, Vol 26, Number 2 HindoRead MoreEthics Case Study : Paradyne1159 Words   |  5 PagesEthics Case Study: Paradyne By Ali Khan for EE4400 1 Background Every good engineer will be ruled by ethics and moral code. Honesty towards his client and fellow team mates is a must for any good engineer. While building designs and turning innovative ideas into reality require dedication and passion. Engineers in their day to day work face hardships and difficult decisions. We spend long and hard days at work. Solving problems in given limited resources and time does make life difficult and goodRead MoreEthics Case Study1862 Words   |  8 PagesAfter review the table l decided not to disclose any information because the harm was more than benefit. Based on the information provided the percentage of infection is very small. The side effective of action is more harmful because the company might close down and coworker will lose job, so many lawsuits in court from previous patients, I will not be able to support my family because l won’t have a job. Deontologist According to Deontology is states that an act done or something done that isRead MoreCase Study On Business Ethics965 Words   |  4 Pages Course Date Student’s Name Institution Case Study on Business Ethics Introduction Ethics describes combination of values that guide the behavior and conduct of persons or entities. It facilitates them to distinguish between wrong and right, good and bad, what can be or should be done and what cannot and should not be done. Business contracts are lawfully binding. However, they are effectual with a robust ethical framework where parties observe and satisfy their contractual responsibilitiesRead MoreCase Study : Ethics Applied1548 Words   |  7 PagesAbstract Throughout this paper the principles and concepts examined throughout the last eight weeks of coursework will be applied to the Nortel Case Study. After a brief introductory discussion of the Nortel Case, a greater understanding of the ethical ramifications of the situation will be facilitated by answering five key questions. Nortel Case Study: Ethics Applied Introduction: Over the last two decades the business world has been rocked by several prominent business scandals such as Enron, WorldComRead MoreEthics Case Study Essay911 Words   |  4 PagesEthics Case Study Nurses are faced with ethical issues and dilemmas on a regular basis. Nurses must understand his or her values and morals to be able to deal adequately with the ethical issues he or she is faced with. Some ethical issues nurses are exposed to may be more difficult than others and the ethical decision making process is learned over time. The purpose of this paper is to identify the ethical issues in the case study provided in the week one assignment. A discussion of how to use

Wednesday, May 13, 2020

Climate Change And Urban Environment - 939 Words

Change in climate is becoming a major concern on a global scale, as it has had a tremendous impact on urban environment. Oxford dictionary defines climate change as: ‘A change in global or regional climate patterns, [†¦] attributed to the increased levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide produced by the use of fossil fuels.’ (Oxford Dictionary 2015) The increasing amount of green house gases (GHG) released in the atmosphere is causing significant changes in the environment leading to unpredictable weather patterns and warming of the climate system is putting a great pressure on city development and infrastructures. This essay outlines three problems caused by climate change in urban areas, and evaluates the effectiveness of some of the mitigation and adaptation strategies. This essay reasons that mitigation and adaptation strategies need to work in synergy in order to address the situation effectively. The three problems caused by climate change are, rise in sea level, varied energy demand, and water scarcity. Firstly, the impact on costal areas contributing to sea level rise has made low-lying cities vulnerable to them. Hunt and Watkiss (2011, p. 32) estimates that a 50 m raise in sea level would render Mumbai’s informal communities in severe despair. Moreover, climate change will lead to variation in energy demand. Hunt and Watkiss (2011, p. 33) explain even though winter heating will decrease due to warmer weather, cooling anticipated increasing in summer, increasing GHGShow MoreRelatedGlobal Environmental Issues Facing Climate Change Essay1245 Words   |  5 PagesBy 2030, the urban population will reach 5 billion – 60 % of the world’s population.It is clear that the development of urban areas holds the key to many of the challenges we face in our interactions with the environment. Climate change has become one of the most challenging global environmental issues facing humanity.. Urban households, industries and infrastructures are key sources of greenhouse gases. Urban areas concentrate populations, economic activities and built environments, thus increasingRead MoreEffects Of Climate Change On Urban Areas871 Words   |  4 Pagespercent of the total population lives in urban areas (UN-Habitat 2009 p. xxii). Growing urbanization has led to many consequences on the environment. As a result, many cities face detrimental effects as the climate is becoming unfavourable daily. This essay outlines the significant impacts caused by climate changes in urban areas and evaluates the effectiveness of mitigation and adaptation approaches to solve these problems. However, the effects due to climate change should be considered and significantRead MoreWhy Wildfires Are An Threat Of Safety, Economy And Environment1567 Words   |  7 PagesWildfires are an increasing threat to safety, economy and environment. Remote sensing technologies offer a la rge diversity of environmental information to help fire risk prevention services. In this regard, the European Copernicus program integrates a suite of space-born and in-situ datasets to support a wide range of applications, including fire risk assessment. This chapter provides an overview of the Copernicus products and services that are currently used to evaluate fire risk conditions, andRead MoreThe Extent to which Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) Can Contribute towards Mitigation and Adaptation to Climate Change Futures1062 Words   |  5 Pages1. Introduction Climate change the ‘wicked problem’ is continuously imposing significant threat to the nature as whole according to the recent projections (IPCC 2013; Bondeau et al. 2013). This anticipated hazard is unavoidable to some extent though the source of the problem (‘green house gas’ emission) is barred right now (IPCC 2014a). Combination of mitigation (reducing or capturing GHG) and adaptation effort has been suggested both in the short and long term to achieve the complementary advantageRead MoreAdaptation Structural And Behavioral Adaptations1628 Words   |  7 Pageskeeps that organism alive. This could mean adapting to climates—cold, moderate, hot as well as climate change—, invasive predators, etc. There are two observed ways of adaptation structural and behavioral. Structural adaptation is a physical change to the organism like how the Aves species adapted to have hollow bones and wings for an aerial lifestyle. Behavioral adaptation is how or ganisms change its ways of hunting, finding shelter, or any change that is done for survival. In this paper, the focusRead MoreThe Age Of Sustainable Development1186 Words   |  5 Pages In his book, The Age of Sustainable Development, Jeffery Sachs begins with the role of technological change in sustainable development. Sachs uses the Maglev in Shanghai as an example of how technological change can help with sustainable development. It improved transport services and energy efficiency, eventually enabling a shift to a clean low carbon system. Instead of being powered by finite resources such as coal or petroleum, the Maglev is powered by electricity. In most cases statesRead MoreClimate Change ´s Impact on the NY-NJ-PA Part of the US1088 Words   |  4 PagesRecently, the environment issues are becoming more and more serious. The increasing of greenhouse gas emission and pollutions lead to many environment problems related to climate change. The climate change impact our urban life in many aspects. As the biggest metropolitan area in US, New York-Newark-Jer sey City, NY-NJ-PA Metropolitan Statistical Area has a population about 19,831,858 by year 2012 (U.S. Department of Commerce, US Census Bureau, 2012) The population has been increased by 1.35% sinceRead More2.1. Urban Green Area Definition And Characteristics. According1189 Words   |  5 Pages2.1. Urban green area definition and characteristics According to James et al. (2009) the terms green space and open space are often used interchangeably. James et al. (2009) considered green spaces as land, whether publicly or privately owned and consists of predominantly unsealed, permeable, surfaces such as soil, grass, shrubs, trees and water. Urban areas are characterized by mosaics of land, which are commercial buildings, residential areas, industrial buildings, and these interspersed withRead MoreUrban Sustainability And Its Impact On The Environment1597 Words   |  7 PagesIntroduction Urban sustainability is a very important topic that needs to be addressed and focused on so that cities and communities all over the world can change and reduce their harmful impact on the environment. In order to do so, communities must develop sustainably by focusing on how to manage resources in a way that guarantees welfare and promotes equity of current and future generations (Elmqvist, 2013). The impact of urbanization is only going to increase, so cities around the world needRead MoreUrbanization Of The 21st Century1542 Words   |  7 PagesIntroduction The 21st century is witnessing an increase of the world’s population into urban dwellers. Dramatic movement of people into major towns and cities of the world is caused by rapid sprawl; this is observed in developed and developing countries. This increasing recognition is inevitable; therefore the solution to urban problems depends largely on effective planning, infrastructural management and development. Usually, unplanned population growth is associated to population demands that supersede

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Communication in care settings Free Essays

This piece of work is about two main theories and they are Tuckman’s theory and Egan’s theory (SOLER). Also the effects of communication on care workers and service users. This will be explained in more detail. We will write a custom essay sample on Communication in care settings or any similar topic only for you Order Now Communication cycle- is very important in our lives, there are lots of ways to communicate nowadays and the list becomes bigger each day. There are lots of ways to communicate but the main structure of the cycle is still the same as it was. First it’s you express yourself then you listen and hear, then they express ones feelings then they listen and hear. And then it goes round like a cycle. http://www.surrey.ac.uk/Skills/pack/enc.html Tuckman’s theory- This stage was developed in 1965’s and the last stage was added in the 1970’s. There are 5 stages and they are forming, storming, norming, and performing. Forming is when the individual themselves is very nervous, scared to show their real feelings so they may just agree with someone to kind of ‘make them happy’. In this stage the individual doesn’t show their personality as they may not feel comfortable round others in their group. http://www.businessballs.com/tuckmanformingstormingnormingperforming.htm The second stage is storming at this stage the individual start to show their real feelings and their personality starts to show. This is because they start to relax and be comfortable around others in their group. Also others in the group may start to have conflict were they have different opinions about ideas, and they don’t agree on others about their ideas. The third stage is norming at this stage individuals start to relax and become more comfortable around others in their group. Also it’s when they get ideas to together and agrees on one, and individuals then start to know what is accepted from them and start to get on with what they have to do within the group. The fourth stage is when all individuals in the group know what their role is in the group and start to work towards their own goals. Then they work together to get the task finish that was set. Sentence and Verbal Communication iframe class="wp-embedded-content" sandbox="allow-scripts" security="restricted" style="position: absolute; clip: rect(1px, 1px, 1px, 1px);" src="https://phdessay.com/sentence-and-verbal-communication/embed/#?secret=ioh8jD6rUx" data-secret="ioh8jD6rUx" width="500" height="282" title="#8220;Sentence and Verbal Communication#8221; #8212; Free Essays - PhDessay.com" frameborder="0" marginwidth="0" marginheight="0" scrolling="no"/iframe The fifth stage and the last stage was added after in 1977 and that was called adjourning is when the tasks is finished with a positive outcome, and then the group breaks up and everything has been fulfilled, and they all move on with a happy attitude with what has been achieved. http://www.businessballs.com/tuckmanformingstormingnormingperforming.htm Scenario: To make the individual benefit from this theory would be by making sure the individual is introduced in the group session that he goes to and that he feels comfortable in the environment. This theory may not be beneficial for all individuals it depends on the situation and if it suits them for example some that has learning difficulties as they may not be able to handle being in a group of people at one time, also people that have mental health problems. Open posture is when you body shows that you are listening to the service user. Showing that you are interested in the conversation, also it can show that you care about them. Also things like putting your arm around the service user by showing that you care and that you are there to listen and comfort them. This can put a bond between you and your social worker. Tone- the tone of your voice is very important as it affects the way the service user responds to you. Your voice should sound something like: – Clear (able to hear) – Upbeat – Welcoming – Under control – Warm feeling to the voice. http://www.impactcommunicationsinc.com/pdf/nwsltr_2001/ICINwsltrph0106.pdf for example if the care worker’s tone is loud and moody and sounds like they’re not bothered then the service user will want to get out of the room as they feel that the care worker doesn’t care and has no respect. This also can make them feel scared and humiliated as the care worker isn’t showing that they care and are bothered about them. But on the other hand it can be that the care worker is talking nicely with a tone that as a warm feeling to it, and that is upbeat and is clear. The service user feels that they are cared for respected for, this makes them want to say and makes them comfortable in the situation so will open up and tell you what’s wrong with them also they feel more relaxed and calm. http://psychology.about.com/od/nonverbalcommunication/a/nonverbaltypes.htm Body language/posture- this is important in communication because it can show lots of information through it, as it can show your feelings and your attitude through it. For example: – Arms/legs crossed- this can come across as doesn’t want to know, doesn’t care, but in different circumstances it can mean that they are scared to open up and can show as an barrier meaning ;don’t come to close to me’. – Head down- this can come across as shy, doesn’t want to know about the problems issues you have. Also showing no eye contact can be real rod if the service user is talking to the care worker and there’s no eye contact can show that you aren’t listening to them. And may feel uncomfortable – Nodding- this show that you are listening to the service user and that you understand what they are saying to you. This can make the service user feel reassured that somebody understands them and that they aren’t alone. How to cite Communication in care settings, Papers

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Strategic Employee Communications Samples †MyAssignmenthelp.com

Question: Discuss about the Strategic Employee Communications. Answer: Recommendations The knowledge base should be accessible to the employees, as the employees of the modern hotel industry is growing at a faster rate, where the knowledge required by the employees will help them in performing their job in an effective manner. The hotels need to have a proper setup so that all the information about the guests and the instructions about health and safety are accessible to the employees as well as the guests. This will help in organizing the guests and helping them during emergency times by the employees (Argenti 1998). The transparency in the workplace needs to be increased by sharing the sales figures of the hotel along with the goals and the reasons why themanagement has decided to bring changes in the organization. This will help the employees to increase their efficiency in the organization, as they will have a sense of responsibility up on them (Mishra, Boynton and Mishra 2014). The employees need to undergo training on a regular basis through various workshops and employee meetings so that it can help them in serving the guests in an efficient manner. The employees need to be addressed regarding the best practices that they need to adopt within the organization and feedbacks from them needs to be encouraged. These workshops will help the hotel by improving the understanding of the employees, which will help the organization in the end. The feedbacks that the employees will provide will help the uppermanagement of the hotel to take better decisions so that it can help in increasing the productivity of the employees (Christensen 2014). The hotel organization needs to give freedom to the employees in choosing the technology platform that they are comfortable in working with. The advancements in technology will help the employees to access the informations that are provided by the organization at any point of time and anywhere. This will help the company in increasing their speed of work in a proficient manner, which will ease out the job for the employees as well (Percy 2014). The use of new tools for communication such as Beekeeper will act as a flexible and effective tool for messaging between themanagement and the employees of the hotel. This will help the company to make the important announcements to the right group of employees so that the other teams are not disturbed. This will help the groups in being engaged in the daily activities in an effective way. These messaging platforms will help the company in sending private messages and emails to the emails so that it will increase the flexibility and the effectiveness of the organization (Argenti 1998). The use of better communication tactics will help the organization and its employees to create a difference in the quality of service so that the guests who come in the organization will have a better experience. The managers need to be responsible in maintaining a proper system of communication so that the staffs can be engaged within the company, which will give good return on the investment. References Argenti, P.A., 1998. Strategic employee communications.Human Resource Management (1986-1998),37(3-4), p.199. Christensen, M., 2014. Communication as a strategic tool in change processes.International journal of business communication,51(4), pp.359-385. Mishra, K., Boynton, L. and Mishra, A., 2014. Driving employee engagement: The expanded role of internal communications.International Journal of Business Communication,51(2), pp.183-202. Percy, L., 2014.Strategic integrated marketing communications. Routledge.

Tuesday, March 31, 2020

Marketing and the Tobacco Industry free essay sample

A paper which examines how the tobacco industry markets its products. Approximately every day the tobacco industry loses around 7,000 customers in the U.S. alone. This paper examines ways in which the tobacco industry markets its products in order to retrieve some of these lost customers, with emphasis on promoting cigarettes to the younger generation. Issues explored include cartoon characters, free cigarette giveaways, sponsored public events and walking billboards. The paper also discusses the results of these attempts on product marketing. The most shocking example is the RJR Nabiscos Joe Camel campaign that aimed to hit its young targets. (Ad weeks Marketing Week, 1991) Joe Camel has greatly influenced not only the teenagers between the ages of 14- 18 years but even the very young. For instance of the study showed that almost one-third of three-year-olds matched Joe Camel with cigarettes and by the age of six, children were as familiar with him as with the Mickey Mouse (Brand Logo Recognition by Children Aged Three to Six Years, 1991). We will write a custom essay sample on Marketing and the Tobacco Industry or any similar topic specifically for you Do Not WasteYour Time HIRE WRITER Only 13.90 / page

Saturday, March 7, 2020

Free Essays on Odepus

"An idea is an eye given by God for the seeing of God. Some of these eyes we can not bear to look out of, we blind them as quickly as possible." (Russell Hoban, American novelist) Sometimes the reality of a situation is so harsh that, instead of facing it, people blind themselves to it. In Oedipus Rex, the theme of sightlessness is prevalent throughout the play. Sophocles uses ambiguity to keep from creating biases toward the characters so that, in a sense the audience, as well as the characters, are blind. Fate and blindness go hand in hand in the play. The main character, Oedipus, is a severe victim of fate, ".... damned in his birth, in his marriage damned, damned in the blood he shed with his own hand." The hero Oedipus is tormented by the punishment of a crime that he did not commit. At birth, it was said that he would "†¦lie with [his] mother, breed children from whom all men would turn their eyes; and that [he] should be [his] father’s murderer." This fate is undeserved and makes one question the reasoning behind the fate. The gods seem heartless and cold in their treatment to an innocent man. The aspect of sightlessness is first mentioned in the discussion between a soothsayer and Oedipus to find out the justification for the punishing, "†¦murdering sea," that Thebes has been thrown upon. The city is being punished by the gods for an offense that has been committed by a criminal who does not know his crime. The question of justice arises and is dismissed just as fast because, "...justice is a concept. Muscle is the reality." The action of the gods may not have seemed fair, but, to coin a phrase, "life isn't fair." From his birth, Oedipus was prophesied to a fate worse than death, so his parents then sentenced him to death. He was bound at the ankles and carried off by a shepherd to be killed. The shepherd then felt pity for the baby in his arms and did not wish to kill it so he gave the baby to another she... Free Essays on Odepus Free Essays on Odepus "An idea is an eye given by God for the seeing of God. Some of these eyes we can not bear to look out of, we blind them as quickly as possible." (Russell Hoban, American novelist) Sometimes the reality of a situation is so harsh that, instead of facing it, people blind themselves to it. In Oedipus Rex, the theme of sightlessness is prevalent throughout the play. Sophocles uses ambiguity to keep from creating biases toward the characters so that, in a sense the audience, as well as the characters, are blind. Fate and blindness go hand in hand in the play. The main character, Oedipus, is a severe victim of fate, ".... damned in his birth, in his marriage damned, damned in the blood he shed with his own hand." The hero Oedipus is tormented by the punishment of a crime that he did not commit. At birth, it was said that he would "†¦lie with [his] mother, breed children from whom all men would turn their eyes; and that [he] should be [his] father’s murderer." This fate is undeserved and makes one question the reasoning behind the fate. The gods seem heartless and cold in their treatment to an innocent man. The aspect of sightlessness is first mentioned in the discussion between a soothsayer and Oedipus to find out the justification for the punishing, "†¦murdering sea," that Thebes has been thrown upon. The city is being punished by the gods for an offense that has been committed by a criminal who does not know his crime. The question of justice arises and is dismissed just as fast because, "...justice is a concept. Muscle is the reality." The action of the gods may not have seemed fair, but, to coin a phrase, "life isn't fair." From his birth, Oedipus was prophesied to a fate worse than death, so his parents then sentenced him to death. He was bound at the ankles and carried off by a shepherd to be killed. The shepherd then felt pity for the baby in his arms and did not wish to kill it so he gave the baby to another she...

Thursday, February 20, 2020

The Desirability of Engagement Strategies in the 21st Century Essay

The Desirability of Engagement Strategies in the 21st Century - Essay Example An accurate definition of ‘engagement’ is needed in order to identify its actual importance to organisations and employees (Torrington, Hall, & Taylor, 2008). However, the best definition depends on the specific circumstances and features of the organisation. MacLeod defines engagement as a process of building ‘mutual respect in the workplace’ (MacLeod & Clarke, 2009, p. 6). He believes that engagement is not only beneficial to the organisation or the employees, but to the nation as a whole. MacLeod views employee engagement as an organisational or corporate strategy intended to make sure that the members of the organisation are committed to its objectives and ideals, driven to contribute to the success of the organisation, and are simultaneously capable of improving their self-respect. The 2012 CIPD Report stated that there are two forms of engagement, namely, emotional and transactional. Emotional engagement takes place when individuals genuinely identify with their organisation and job. It occurs when employees are driven by the desire to perform well at work. On the other hand, transactional engagement refers to a two-way relationship. It appears to be about acknowledging the dynamic involvement of all members of a relationship (e.g. employer and employee). Basically, engagement is characterised as a psychological condition that involves an affective and cognitive aspect, or, feeling and thinking, respectively. Basically, work engagement is a constructive affective and cognitive condition that is stimulated and tends to lead to motivated attitude and behaviour at work (Armstrong, 2006). According to Lucas and colleagues (2007), engagement is a... Employee engagement has been correlated in different studies to greater innovation and efficiency, lower turnover and number of absences, higher earnings per share, and so on. For example, the study of Corporate Leadership Council (CLC) reported that organisations with a well engaged workforce progress more rapidly than companies with disengaged employees. Likewise, the study of Towers Watson discovered that companies with high levels of engagement experienced an increase in net profit margin and operating margin. Company studies also emphasise correlations between organisational outcome and engagement. The 2005 ISR research reported that organisations with low engagement levels experienced a decline in operating margin and net profit over a 3-year period. The Hay Group reported that specialised service companies with high levels of employee engagement were significantly more efficient. Stanford University reports that employee engagement leads to substantial organisational advantage s. Gallup studies found out that engaged employees are more likely to remain in the organisation, more efficient, and friendlier to customers.